situation behaviour impact feedback tool
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The Situation Behaviour Impact Feedback Tool

Knowing how to create and deliver effective feedback is a key leadership skill, and a necessary skill when coaching others to also give feedback. Effective feedback motivates the receiver to start, continue or stop behaviours that affect performance. In addition to accomplishing its direct purpose, an effective feedback message is a self-development tool for the receiver. The Situation, Behaviour and Impact (SBI) Feedback Tool provides a framework for planning and delivering feedback. Read this article to learn how to implement it in your workplace.

 

Why is it Important to Deliver Effective Feedback

Ineffective feedback often is vague, indirect, and exaggerated with generalities that can judge the person rather than his or her actions. This can result in messages that are hurtful, confusing, and will make the receiver unsure of what to do with the feedback.

The Situation, Behaviour and Impact (SBI) Feedback Tool provides a framework for planning and delivering effective feedback.

What is The Situation, Behaviour and Impact (SBI) Feedback Tool

The SBI Feedback Tool was created by Sloan Weitzel for the Centre for Creative Leadership. It was developed to help managers deliver clear, specific feedback. It also helps to depersonalise the feedback and gives the receiver time to respond.

How does it work

  1. Situation – when and where the behaviour happened
  2. Behaviour – the receiver’s specific behaviour
  3. Impact – the impact this behaviour had on others

Following each piece of the process is important for the SBI Feedback Tool to work, so let’s look at them in more detail and with examples.

Situation

When you’re giving feedback, always confirm the location and time of the situation you are referring to. This will allow the feedback to be put into context, giving the receiver a specific reference and setting.

For example:

“When you were delivering your weekly sales figures……”

or

“At last week’s team meeting …”

Behaviour

This is about the specific behaviours that you want to address. Remember always to be objective and non-judgemental of the behaviour in question.

For example:

“When you were delivering your weekly sales figures on Friday, some of the calculations were wrong …”

or

“At last week’s team meeting, your presentation to the board was excellent …”

Impact

This is about how a person’s behaviour has impacted you or others. Ideally, you want to go beyond facts and include feelings. You are trying to create an emotional engagement with your feedback and so stating how you felt or how you imagine others may have felt, will increase that connection.

For example:

“When you were delivering your weekly sales figures on Friday, some of your calculations were wrong. I was a bit confused, as I knew the team had performed well. I am worried that they might be feeling de-motivated.

or

“At last week’s team meeting, your presentation to the board was excellent. I thought all of the slides were accurate and appropriate, which made for a concise and impressive delivery.”

What happens next?

From here, the conversation should shift to supporting the planning of actions to start, continue or stop specific behaviours. Allow the person time to digest the feedback and then agree on a specific action plan to assist the improvement of the behaviours discussed.

https://www.ccl.org/blog/feedback-you-can-fathom/

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